West Londo Lake Association

Dedicated to the betterment of the West Londo Lake Area

Last update, this page:  8/20/18
Sent by Savin, 8/20/18
Please be advised that Savin Lake Services will be treating West Londo Lake for aquatic weeds and algae on Tuesday August 21, 2018. (weather permitting)  If you have any questions, comments, or require any additional information, please feel free to contact us. Have a great day!
Sent by Savin, 6/29/18

Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page.

- DNR NEWS -

June 28, 2018
Contact: Kevin Walters, 616-250-8637 or Tiffany Brown, MDEQ public information officer, 517-284-6716

State partners with local communities to host invasive species outreach events at boat launches June 30-July 8

Gov. Snyder proclaims July 1-7 as Aquatic Invasive Species Awareness Week
Gov. Rick Snyder has proclaimed July 1-7, 2018, as Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) Awareness Week in Michigan. Several state departments are observing the week with outreach events at more than 80 boat launches across the state aimed at creating increased public awareness about non-native aquatic plants and animals that can disrupt the natural ecosystem, tourism and the economy.
The week is highlighted by the fifth annual AIS Landing Blitz, which is an outreach event for boaters held June 30-July 8 at boat landings around the state. The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) is partnering with local volunteers as well as the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development to assist boaters in learning how to prevent the spread of harmful species and comply with current aquatic invasive species-related laws.
"The presence of aquatic invasive species in Michigan - and the threat of new ones - is a reality that we ask every resident and visitor to take seriously," said Kevin Walters, aquatic biologist with the DEQ. "By participating in events like the AIS Landing Blitz and learning more about preventing the spread of invasive species, we can all help protect Michigan's incredible natural resources."
Anyone enjoying Michigan's waters can help prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species by following these simple steps:  
Required Actions - It's the Law in Michigan
  • Remove aquatic plants from boats, boating equipment and boat trailers before launching or placing in the water.  
  • Drain live wells, bilges and all water from boats before leaving the access site.  
  • Dispose of unused bait in the trash. Do not release bait into the water.  
  • Don't transfer fish to water bodies other than where they were caught.  
Recommended Actions - Protect Our Waters
  • Inspect and remove plants and mud from boats and trailers, and dry equipment before leaving the access area. Dispose of the material in a trash receptacle or otherwise away from the water body, if possible.  
  • Wash boats and trailers before leaving the access area, if possible, or at a nearby car wash or at home.  
  • Dry boats and equipment for at least five days before launching into a different body of water.  
  • Disinfect live wells and bilges with a bleach solution of one half-cup of bleach to five gallons of water.  
A short DEQ video from a past Landing Blitz shows how easy it is to clean, drain and dry boats and trailers. Additionally, several DEQ educational videos about invasive species can be viewed here.
With recent discoveries of invasive species such as red swamp crayfish in at least 16 bodies of water, and parrot feather, an invasive aquatic plant, in three separate ponds, the week takes on added importance. Many invasive species are easily spread by boaters and anglers who use their equipment in multiple bodies of water without properly cleaning it. 
The Great Lakes and Michigan's inland waters annually draw millions of recreational users and tourists, and already are negatively affected by numerous aquatic invasive species. Preventing the further introduction of additional invasive species is a responsibility of everyone who uses these valuable fresh-water resources. 
Events at boat launches are contingent on local weather and volunteer availability. For an up-to-date list of events, contact Kevin Walters at 616-250-8637.
AIS Awareness Week is sponsored by DEQ's Water Resources Division, with collaborative efforts from other state and federal agencies as well as private and nonprofit organizations. For more information about AIS Awareness Week, the AIS Landing Blitz or to view the governor's proclamation, visit Michigan's invasive species web site at www.michigan.gov/invasives.
The DEQ is dedicated to respect for Michigan's citizens, stewardship of the environment, and support for a sustainable economy.

/Note to editors: An accompanying photo is available below for download. Caption information follows.
Volunteers during an AIS Lansing Blitz event at a boat launch show a boater how to check for and remove aquatic plants. Photo courtesy Michigan Department of Environmental Quality./

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state's natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. For more information, go to www.michigan.gov/dnr.
NOTICE
This area of West Londo Lake will be treated with Aquatic Herbicides on 06/14/18
for the control of an aquatic nuisance under: (select one of the following)
DEQ Permit No. ANC9803305

The following water use restrictions apply through the expiration date indicated below:
Chemical product / active ingredient
Chemical Trade Name(s) such as:
Do not use this water for swimming and bathing until 6/15/18
Do not use this water for ornamentals or turf irrigation until 6/19/18
Do not use this water for domestic purposes or agricultural irrigation until 6/19/18
Do not use this water for livestock watering or similar purposes until 6/19/18.
Spefically, in this order: 
1) swimming & bathing, 2) ornamental or turf irrig., 3) Domestic purposes,
4)livestock water or similar puposes

2,4-D - Navigate, Sculpin G  - N/A
Adjuvant - Cygnet Plus, PolyAn, Agridex: N/A (1-4)
Chelated copper - Cutrine Plus, Captain, Symmetry: 1) 06/15/18, 2-4) N/A
Copper sulfate - Old Bridge, Triangle Brand N/A (1-4)
Diquat dibromide, Littora, Reward, Alligare, Tribune: 1) 06/15/18, (2-4) 06/19/18
Endothall - Hydrothol 191: (1-4) 06/15/18
Endothall - Aquathol K: (1-4) 06/15/18
Fluridone - Whitecap, AVAST, Sonar: N/A
Glyphosate - AquaStar, AquaNeat: N/A
Triclopyr - Renovate 3: N/A
Water dye / colorants - Cygnet Select: N/A

Company/Individual conducting treatment:
Permit information:
Name: Savin Lake Services Inc.
3088 Hottis Road, Hale, MI 48739
      Toll Free 1-877-SAV-LAKE

Department of Environmental Quality
Water Bureau
PO Box 30273
Lansing MI 48909-7773
e-mail: DEQ-LWM-ANC@michigan.gov
Phone: (517) 284-5593

The chemicals used for Aquatic Nuisance Control are registered by the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency and the Michigan Department of Agriculture. The potential for damage
to fish and other non-target organisms is minimal provided that the product is used as
directed on the product label and the permit.
To minimize the possible  effects on health
and the environment, the treated water is restricted for the above purposes.

DO NOT REMOVE SIGNS OR MAPS UNTIL ALL WATER USE RESTRICTIONS HAVE EXPIRED
Authority: Parts 31 and 33 of P.A. 451 of 1994, as amended EQP-2797 (Rev. 10/07)
 

We currently have West Londo Lake scheduled for treatment on Thursday June 14th (weather permitting).  The cold spring delayed and retarded weed growth initially – and the extremely hot weather over the past couple of weeks has accelerated weed growth and  created havoc with our schedules.

 

In regards to the initial billing for West Londo Lake – we have billed according to the current contract – and it has been that way for over (10) years. 

 

Please let us know if you have any questions.




Statewide DNR News
July 17, 2017
Contact: Joe Nohner, 517-284-6236 or Joanne Foreman, 517-284-5814

Lakes Appreciation Month reminds everyone to enjoy and protect Michigan's lakes

Michigan offers unique combination of four Great Lakes and 11,000 inland lakes

With Gov. Rick Snyder's proclamation of July as Lakes Appreciation Month in Michigan, it's the perfect time to encourage residents to enjoy and protect the state's lakes.
Recreation on Michigan's lakes - boating, fishing, birding, swimming and more on the water - leads to jobs throughout the state in support of a $7 billion recreational fishery, a $4 billion boating industry, and a major part of the state's $38 billion tourism revenue.
Michigan's 11,000 inland lakes and four Great Lakes provide a combination of water resources and recreational opportunities not available anywhere else. In his proclamation, Gov. Snyder recognized "the need to protect these resources for future generations," stating that "lakes and shorelines are critical resources to Michigan's environment and quality of life, providing sources of drinking water, irrigation, energy, commerce, recreation, scenic beauty, and habitat for fish and wildlife."
"It's important for everyone who uses and values Michigan's lakes to do their part to protect them," said Joe Nohner, inland lakes analyst for the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. "Our inland lakes face threats from declining water quality, invasive species, changing climate and unnatural shorelines that lack vegetation or woody habitat. There are simple steps each of us can take to protect the lakes we love."
Here are just a few ways to show appreciation for these valuable natural resources:
Be a lake volunteer. Volunteer opportunities are available with programs across Michigan. Clean Boats, Clean Waters is recruiting "volunteer heroes" to help prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species by showing boaters how to inspect their boats, trailers and gear. Michigan's Clean Water Corps supports volunteers engaged in water-quality monitoring through its Cooperative Lakes Monitoring Program. Adopt-a-Beach volunteers remove litter from shorelines around the Great Lakes.
Protect your shore. Lakefront property owners can learn more from the Michigan Natural Shoreline Partnership about maintaining natural shorelines to improve fish and wildlife habitat and keep the water clean. Learn how to be recognized through the Michigan Shoreland Stewards program.
Prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species. Lakes Appreciation Month and Aquatic Invasive Species Awareness Week were kicked off by the 4th annual AIS Landing Blitz with outreach events at more than 60 boat launches, to raise awareness and prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species through recreational boating and related activities. When it's time to head home from the lake, take steps to ensure aquatic invasive species don't come with you:
  • Remove weeds, mud and debris from boats and gear, and drain live wells and bilges before leaving the landing.
  • Give boats and equipment at least five days to dry thoroughly before heading to a different body of water.
  • If that's not possible, clean boats, water receptacles and gear with hot water or a diluted bleach solution before the next trip.
In short, remember to clean, drain and dry boats, trailers and gear after a day on the water. Concerned about aquatic invasive species? Consider inviting the free Mobile Boat Wash to a boat launch near you.
Take a friend or a young person fishing. Fishing Michigan's lakes provides an opportunity to spend quality time with someone, reunite a friend with a favorite hobby, or introduce someone to a new pastime. Whether it's taking the boat to that favorite fishing hole or casting from a pier or quiet dock, fishing is a unique way to connect with the water.
Spend a day at the beach. A picnic or a day of swimming is a great way to get the kids outdoors in the summer. A sunset stroll along the shoreline can be a relaxing end to a perfect day. Looking for a place to take your four-legged best friend? According to bringfido.com, there are 27 dog-friendly beaches across Michigan.
Float your boat. If that boat is still covered and sitting on the trailer, or the kayaks haven't yet left the garage, it's time to hit the water. Take a cruise or paddle around the shoreline of your favorite lake to admire the waterfowl and flowering plants, or visit a new lake - with more than 1,300 public boating access sites around the state to choose from, it's easy to plan a water-bound adventure.
The Lakes Appreciation Month proclamation was supported by the Michigan Inland Lakes Partnership, an organization that promotes collaboration to advance stewardship of Michigan's inland lakes.  
/Note to editors: Accompanying photos are available below for download. Suggested captions follow.
Scenic_lake_view DSK27-050: Michigan is blessed with all types of waterbodies, including scenic locations without much civilization in site, like this view of Tahquamenon Natural Area between Newberry and Paradise in the state's Upper Peninsula.
Fishing_boat DSK224-34: Fishing and boating go hand in hand as staple activities on many of Michigan's lakes, making huge contributions to the state's economy./

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state's natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. For more information, go to www.michigan.gov/dnr.










Savin Lake Services, Inc.
3088 Hottis Road
Hale, MI 48739
989-728-2200
Visit our Website at www.lakeandpond.com
Like us on Facebook

Statewide DNR News
July 17, 2017
Contact: Joe Nohner, 517-284-6236 or Joanne Foreman, 517-284-5814

Lakes Appreciation Month reminds everyone to enjoy and protect Michigan's lakes

Michigan offers unique combination of four Great Lakes and 11,000 inland lakes

With Gov. Rick Snyder's proclamation of July as Lakes Appreciation Month in Michigan, it's the perfect time to encourage residents to enjoy and protect the state's lakes.
Recreation on Michigan's lakes - boating, fishing, birding, swimming and more on the water - leads to jobs throughout the state in support of a $7 billion recreational fishery, a $4 billion boating industry, and a major part of the state's $38 billion tourism revenue.
Michigan's 11,000 inland lakes and four Great Lakes provide a combination of water resources and recreational opportunities not available anywhere else. In his proclamation, Gov. Snyder recognized "the need to protect these resources for future generations," stating that "lakes and shorelines are critical resources to Michigan's environment and quality of life, providing sources of drinking water, irrigation, energy, commerce, recreation, scenic beauty, and habitat for fish and wildlife."
"It's important for everyone who uses and values Michigan's lakes to do their part to protect them," said Joe Nohner, inland lakes analyst for the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. "Our inland lakes face threats from declining water quality, invasive species, changing climate and unnatural shorelines that lack vegetation or woody habitat. There are simple steps each of us can take to protect the lakes we love."
Here are just a few ways to show appreciation for these valuable natural resources:
Be a lake volunteer. Volunteer opportunities are available with programs across Michigan. Clean Boats, Clean Waters is recruiting "volunteer heroes" to help prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species by showing boaters how to inspect their boats, trailers and gear. Michigan's Clean Water Corps supports volunteers engaged in water-quality monitoring through its Cooperative Lakes Monitoring Program. Adopt-a-Beach volunteers remove litter from shorelines around the Great Lakes.
Protect your shore. Lakefront property owners can learn more from the Michigan Natural Shoreline Partnership about maintaining natural shorelines to improve fish and wildlife habitat and keep the water clean. Learn how to be recognized through the Michigan Shoreland Stewards program.
Prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species. Lakes Appreciation Month and Aquatic Invasive Species Awareness Week were kicked off by the 4th annual AIS Landing Blitz with outreach events at more than 60 boat launches, to raise awareness and prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species through recreational boating and related activities. When it's time to head home from the lake, take steps to ensure aquatic invasive species don't come with you:
  • Remove weeds, mud and debris from boats and gear, and drain live wells and bilges before leaving the landing.
  • Give boats and equipment at least five days to dry thoroughly before heading to a different body of water.
  • If that's not possible, clean boats, water receptacles and gear with hot water or a diluted bleach solution before the next trip.
In short, remember to clean, drain and dry boats, trailers and gear after a day on the water. Concerned about aquatic invasive species? Consider inviting the free Mobile Boat Wash to a boat launch near you.
Take a friend or a young person fishing. Fishing Michigan's lakes provides an opportunity to spend quality time with someone, reunite a friend with a favorite hobby, or introduce someone to a new pastime. Whether it's taking the boat to that favorite fishing hole or casting from a pier or quiet dock, fishing is a unique way to connect with the water.
Spend a day at the beach. A picnic or a day of swimming is a great way to get the kids outdoors in the summer. A sunset stroll along the shoreline can be a relaxing end to a perfect day. Looking for a place to take your four-legged best friend? According to bringfido.com, there are 27 dog-friendly beaches across Michigan.
Float your boat. If that boat is still covered and sitting on the trailer, or the kayaks haven't yet left the garage, it's time to hit the water. Take a cruise or paddle around the shoreline of your favorite lake to admire the waterfowl and flowering plants, or visit a new lake - with more than 1,300 public boating access sites around the state to choose from, it's easy to plan a water-bound adventure.
The Lakes Appreciation Month proclamation was supported by the Michigan Inland Lakes Partnership, an organization that promotes collaboration to advance stewardship of Michigan's inland lakes.  
/Note to editors: Accompanying photos are available below for download. Suggested captions follow.
Scenic_lake_view DSK27-050: Michigan is blessed with all types of waterbodies, including scenic locations without much civilization in site, like this view of Tahquamenon Natural Area between Newberry and Paradise in the state's Upper Peninsula.
Fishing_boat DSK224-34: Fishing and boating go hand in hand as staple activities on many of Michigan's lakes, making huge contributions to the state's economy./

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state's natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. For more information, go to www.michigan.gov/dnr.










Savin Lake Services, Inc.
3088 Hottis Road
Hale, MI 48739
989-728-2200
Visit our Website at www.lakeandpond.com
Like us on Facebook

The link below this is from the Oakland Press issue of 6/9/14, explaining the issue of Eurasian 
Watermilfoil Starry Stonewart in Oakland County lakes.  The location may not be our own, but 
the issues are the same.  The story tells about what can and cannot be done, what works, 
what doesn't and what just doesn't matter.  Knowledge is power!
Oakland Press weed story

Please click on the tabs to the left for additional content.  Any suggestions, photos (jpeg only), 

articles you would like in, etc, should be directed to Gary Benning, at garyb36350@yahoo.com.